DISCIPLINE MASTERS TRAINING PERIOD MASTERS TRAINING VENUE MASTERS COMPETITION PERIOD & VENUE
ARTISTIC SWIMMING 1-2 June 2020 Széchy Tamás swimming pool 3-7 June 2020; Széchy Tamás swimming pool
DISCIPLINE MASTERS TRAINING PERIOD
ARTISTIC SWIMMING 1-2 June 2020
MASTERS TRAINING VENUE MASTERS COMPETITION PERIOD & VENUE
Széchy Tamás swimming pool 3-7 June 2020; Széchy Tamás swimming pool

THE COMPETITION

Artistic (synchronised) swimming involves swimmers performing figures to music. Despite the seemingly effortless performances, this sport is quite demanding indeed. Competitors, who usually trains 7-8 hours a day, need strength and flexibility to perform twists and lifts as well as rhythm and flair to synchronise and interpret the music, which they listen to through underwater loudspeakers.

Routines can be anything from two and a half minutes to five minutes long, depending on whether they compete in solo or as member of a team. Solo, duet, team and mixed duet synchro swimmers are required to perform in two routines: technical and free. The technical routine involves predetermined elements that must be executed in a specific order. The free routine has no requirements so the swimmers can be ‘free’ in how creative they get with music and their choreography. The free combination routine is a combination of solo, duet, trio, team in one routine performed by no more than 10 swimmers.

The judges award points on a scale of 0.0-10.0 (in tenths). There are three 5-member panels of judges, with the first panel scoring technical merit and synchronisation, the second scoring artistic impression (choreography, music interpretation and manner of presentation) and the third scoring difficulty in free routines and required elements in technical routines. No athletes are permitted to touch the bottom of the pool during a routine, even when lifting one another.

THE HISTORY

Annette Kellerman was a champion distance swimmer, diver, and experienced ballerina in the early 1900s. After making a name for herself in Australia, she moved to England where she impressed the world by swimming almost thirty miles down the River Thames and a few years later she performed in her shocking one piece swim suit underwater in a large glass tank at the New York Hippodrome. It became a landmark event for synchronized swimming and its quick rise in popularity.

Aqua shows became a popular form of entertainment from that point on and kept synchronised swimming in the minds of the public. The first competition was held back in 1891 in Berlin for Ladies, while a year later a similar contest was organised for Gentlemen in London. In those days the sport was called artistic swimming or water ballet – so the discipline just returned to its origins when it was renamed to artistic swimming a couple of years ago.

Then Hollywood discovered swimming champion Esther Williams, nicknamed ‘America’s Mermaid’ who helped popularising synchronised swimming through a series of hugely successful films in the 1940s and ’50s.

As a sport it came into existence in competitions held in the 70s. It became part of the programme immediately at the first World Championships in 1973 – LEN has organised a stand-alone European event in the next year, then, from 1977, it also became a regular discipline at the ‘big’ Europeans. Synchro made its debut at the Olympics in 1984, at the beginning solo and duet were in the spotlight, from 1996 the team event became the main attraction. In 2015 artistic swimming got a new boost when the males were also introduced to the sport on an elite level, the mixed duet was held for the first time at the Worlds in Kazan, and the first European titles were awarded in the following year in London.

THE HISTORY

Annette Kellerman was a champion distance swimmer, diver, and experienced ballerina in the early 1900s. After making a name for herself in Australia, she moved to England where she impressed the world by swimming almost thirty miles down the River Thames and a few years later she performed in her shocking one piece swim suit underwater in a large glass tank at the New York Hippodrome. It became a landmark event for synchronized swimming and its quick rise in popularity.

Aqua shows became a popular form of entertainment from that point on and kept synchronised swimming in the minds of the public. The first competition was held back in 1891 in Berlin for Ladies, while a year later a similar contest was organised for Gentlemen in London. In those days the sport was called artistic swimming or water ballet – so the discipline just returned to its origins when it was renamed to artistic swimming a couple of years ago.

Then Hollywood discovered swimming champion Esther Williams, nicknamed ‘America’s Mermaid’ who helped popularising synchronised swimming through a series of hugely successful films in the 1940s and ’50s.

As a sport it came into existence in competitions held in the 70s. It became part of the programme immediately at the first World Championships in 1973 – LEN has organised a stand-alone European event in the next year, then, from 1977, it also became a regular discipline at the ‘big’ Europeans. Synchro made its debut at the Olympics in 1984, at the beginning solo and duet were in the spotlight, from 1996 the team event became the main attraction. In 2015 artistic swimming got a new boost when the males were also introduced to the sport on an elite level, the mixed duet was held for the first time at the Worlds in Kazan, and the first European titles were awarded in the following year in London.

THE BESTS IN EUROPE

It’s beyond doubt that in this sport the bests of our continent are also the bests in the world. The Russian artistic swimmers rule the pools since the 90s, today the situation is very simple: wherever they enter an event, they win it. The last time anyone bested them in duet dates back to 2001 (the Japanese came first in their home Worlds in Fukuoka). In solo the one and only Frenchwoman Virginie Dediu could finish ahead of her Russian rivals on three occasions, in 2007 for the last time. While no team could ever beat them since 1998 at World Championships or Olympics, while at the European Championships the last edition having seen other winner than the Russian team was in 1989. Here their unbeaten streak counts 16 championships – so far.

Today Ukraine can be regarded the No. 2 nation after the Russians but Spain also had some brilliant results from the past decade as well as the Italians and the Greeks. In the new event, the mixed duet, Russia’s Alexandr Maltsev and Italy’s Giorgio Minisini are the two best male artistic swimmers by all means.

MASTERS ARTISTIC SWIMMING

”The Masters programme shall promote fitness, friendship, understanding and competition through Swimming, Diving, Artistic Swimming, Water Polo and Open Water Swimming among competitors with a minimum age of 25 years.”

This general rule is more than true to our Artistic Synchronised Swimming comunity. We all love the sport and enjoy the company of other athletes, coaches and judges. Although taking part in competitions is a motivation and a challenge. Competitors represent the same club. They compete in several age groups from 25 to 80+. The events are Solo, Duet, Mixed Duet, Team and Free Combination.

Athletes compete in Technical Routines and Free Routines. Technical Routines include 6-9 required elements, the first five must be shown in a given order, others could be performed at any time during the routine. Swimwears are black, and they wear a white cap. They perform required and supplementary elements simultaneously, facing the same direction. In Free Routines theme, choreography, content, figures or patterns are optional.

The scores are given by 3 panels of judges. Each judge gives one score between 0-10, in tenth. The first panel (Execution) evaluate the execution and synchronisation of the performance. In Technical Routines the second panel (Impression) score for choreography, use of music, manner of presentation and difficulty, the third panel (Elements) rate the required elements. In Free Routines the second panel (Artistic Impression) judge choreography, use of music and manner of presentation, the third panel (Difficulty) score for difficulty.

The results of Technical and Free Routines are added in Solo, Duet, Mixed Duet and Team to get the final result. Free Combination is one event by itself.

Hungarian Masters Artistic Swimming

Despite the short time Hungarian clubs are involved, we are proud of some great results. World Masters Budapest 2017: Solo 25-29 silver medal Dóra Radványi (SYNUS SC), Duet 25-29 gold medal Júlia Győri-Julia Kiss (BVSC), silver medal Kata Stumpf-Dorottya Kovács (BVSC), Mixed Duet 30-39 bronze medal Dóra Radványi-Miklós Goschy (SYNUS SC) Team 25-34 bronze medal BHSE, Free Combination 25-39 gold medal BVSC. European Masters Slovenia 2018: Solo 25-29 bronze medal Lili Blaskó (BVSC), Duet 25-29 gold medal Kata Stumpf-Julia Kiss, bronze medal Réka László-Zsófia László, Team 25-34 gold medal BVSC, bronze medal BHSE, Free Combination 25-39 gold medal BVSC.